WellesleyWeston Magazine

SUMMER 2015

Launched in 2005, WellesleyWeston Magazine is a quarterly publication tailored to Wellesley and Weston residents and edited to enrich the experience of living in two of Massachusetts' most desirable communities.

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The wholesale adoption of Shingle Style by architectural superstars long before Vincent Scully named the genre means a fair number should be visible from your car window in Wellesley neighborhoods like Cottage Street and along Weston's older streets. A host of other factors make Shingle Style homes something special and very much in demand these days. Consider their distinguished pedigree: Such influential 19th-century designers as Andrew Jackson Downing; H.H. Richardson; McKim, Mead & White of Newport fame; and no less a figure than Frank Lloyd Wright all nurtured Shingle Style through its dawning days of glory beginning before the Civil War and stretching on into the Gilded Age and the early 20th century. If now you're convinced and ready to learn more, some reading and online research might be in order, and you may want to talk to friends about the many wonderful architects with which Wellesley and Weston are so well endowed. Their award-winning portfolios should 44 W e l l e s l e y W e s t o n M a g a z i n e | s u m m e r 2 0 1 5 Shingle Style Special Charm Whether you spot an older home or one of more recent vintage, such residences are invariably possessed of special charm and engaging good looks. Their roots run deep in the vernacular of American resi- dential architecture, yet offer a host of sizes and configurations to suit the most modest or outgoing tastes. When taken together, they suggest the possibility that, no matter whether you buy, build, or revamp a Shingle Style home, the odds are you're going to end up with one you really, really like. Shingle Style homes tend to be unornamented, thus avoiding the abundant detailing that can make an otherwise well thought out home seem busy and even frivolous. They also have an organic look achieved when stone foundations and naturalized flowerbeds make a home appear to grow out of a landscape. And then there is the ability to reflect a variety of needs and configurations, especially when you decide to have one designed to order by a knowledgeable architect. "Shingle Style homes tend to be unornamented, thus avoiding the abundant detailing that can make an otherwise well thought out home seem busy and even frivolous." C O U R T E S Y O F M E Y E R & M E Y E R A R C H I T E C T U R E A N D I N T E R I O R S

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