WellesleyWeston Magazine

SPRING 2015

Launched in 2005, WellesleyWeston Magazine is a quarterly publication tailored to Wellesley and Weston residents and edited to enrich the experience of living in two of Massachusetts' most desirable communities.

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Tsai and the company's president, Brad Murray, who was raised in Wellesley, both have strong core values about their products and how they are manufactured. And these values come through in other ways, as well. Murray explains that TATCHA contributes part of its profits from every full-sized skincare product it sells to help disadvantaged girls around the world go to school. "We believe that beauty begins with the heart and the mind," he says. Both business partners earned their MBAs from Harvard Business School (even overlapping a year: she graduated in 2006 and he in 2007), but they didn't actually meet until an alumni gathering in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2009, where each of them had ended up after graduate school. The TATCHA Story The story starts in 2009, when Tsai traveled to Japan. She wanted to see if she could heal the acute dermatitis that had resulted from testing mainstream skincare products on her own face during an internship with a beauty company. She was especially looking for blotting papers, called aburatorigami, which she had used as a teenager in her mother's Asian beauty store. Tsai, who is Chinese-American, had learned that the best blotting paper was the paper craftsmen used when they hammered gold leaf to objects. She was told by locals in Kyoto that this type of aburatorigami was still used by the current-day geishas in town. Her first reaction was, "Do geishas still exist?" Then she met a geisha with flawless skin who listened to her story about her skin troubles and took her to a tea. It was a serendipitous meeting. Tsai was stunned when she saw this woman without her heavy ceremonial makeup. "I've never seen skin like that, except on a child," she says. Tsai learned that the geishas' skincare rituals were passed down orally from one generation of geishas to the next, and the products 136 W e l l e s l e y W e s t o n M a g a z i n e | s p r i n g 2 0 1 5 business "beauty begins with the heart and the mind" Victoria Tsai (left) and a geisha T H O R S W I F T P H O T O G R A P H Y

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